The Enemy Fled

By Olga Tsapina, Norris Foundation Curator of American Historical Manuscripts at the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

april 29 - mssEC_02_091 - news of new orleans capture rejoiced

Camp near Pittsburgh Tenn
Apl 29th Rcvd 29th
Hon Stanton Genl Pope sent force to Monterey
this morning the enemy fled our
forces took fifteen prisoners some baggage
and supplies We destroyed encampment and
returned to camp in good order
there is a reconnaissance but to
explore the country to Farmington No
news from it yet Our army
greatly rejoiced to hear of capture
of New Orleans Thos A Scott —– —– —–
 

On April 29, 1862, Thomas A. Scott, the Assistant Secretary of War telegraphed to his boss from camp near Pittsburg, Tenn.: “Genl. Pope sent force to Monterey this morning the enemy fled our forces took fifteen prisoners some baggage and supplies We destroyed encampment and returned to camp in good order.” This was the beginning of the advance on Corinth, a massive operation by the combined forces of the Armies of the Tennessee and Ohio, commanded by Henry W. Halleck, with John Pope commanding the left wing of Halleck’s army.

Scott also noted that “our army greatly rejoiced to hear the capture of New Orleans.” Indeed it was on the very same day when Farragut’s sailors from the USS Hartford removed the Louisiana state flag from the City Hall.

The coincidence seemed like a good omen. On May 3, the very same day when Stanton declared the Crescent City “recovered” for the Union, Pope would capture Farmington, just six miles away from Corinth. Corinth, “the vertebrae of the Confederacy,” would surrender on May 29, 1862, just a month after this telegram.

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